Kitagawa Utamaro | Erotic Print | Japan | Edo period (1615–1868) | The Met - edo period erotic

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edo period erotic - Shunga: Japan's Ancient Erotica


Jul 21, 2019 · This stylistic movement sought to express an erotic idealization of the urban life during the Edo period. An example of shun-ga erotic art. Credit: fotoember / Adobe Stock. The allure of shun-ga is well known to any who have studied Japanese art. Though, it is not their visual portrayal of lewd acts which makes them so sought after.Author: B. B. Wagner. Japan's Edo period, stretching from the 17th to 19th century, was characterized by economic growth and a rigid social order, both of which worked together to bolster a before unrealized interest in art, culture, entertainment and, yes, sex. While most marriages at the time were arranged -- and Author: Priscilla Frank.

Japanese Erotic Fantasies: Sexual Imagery of the Edo Period. Japanese Erotic Fantasies presents over 200 images, principally from the Edo period but also from the following Meiji era. Many of these works - drawn from international private and museum collections - are reproduced here for the first time.Cited by: 5. during the Edo period. Sex and Erotic Art in Japan By the time of the Tokugawa, there had been a long history of erotic art and secular sexual expression in Japan, which meant that shunga was nothing new. Prehistoric societies had developed phallic worship in connection with .

Erotic Print. Kitagawa Utamaro Japanese. Read More. Not on view Public Domain Download image; Enlarge image; Object Details. Artist: Kitagawa Utamaro (Japanese, ca. 1754–1806) Period: Edo period (1615–1868) Culture: Japan. Medium: Polychrome woodblock print; ink and color on paper. Dimensions: Image: 10 in. × 15 1/8 in. (25.4 × 38.4. Japanese Erotic Fantasies: Sexual Imagery of the Edo Period. Japanese Erotic Fantasies presents over 200 images, principally from the Edo period but also from the following Meiji era. Many of these works - drawn from international private and museum collections - are reproduced here for the first time. The catalogue is introduced by an essay from Chris Uhlenbeck which examines the history.